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Ray Allen passes Reggie Miller for career 3-pointers

BOSTON — Ray Allen broke the NBA record for 3-pointers Thursday night, sinking two in the first quarter against the Los Angeles Lakers as the man he passed, former Indiana Pacers great Reggie Miller, sat courtside working the TV broadcast.

Allen hit his second 3 of the game with 1:48 left in the first quarter to reach 2,561 in his career — a number that flashed on the scoreboard in green and white while the TD Garden erupted in applause. Then the Celtics lost 92-86 to the Los Angeles Lakers.

Allen, 38, celebrated little as he got back on defense, but at the next whistle he went over to Miller for a hug and a handshake, then bumped fists with Lakers star Kobe Bryant.

“I’m just so happy for him because this is one of the best guys,” Miller said on the TNT broadcast. “Ray is so humble, he’s so giving, he’s a great family man and I’m excited. This is great. This is great for the game of basketball. You know why? We’re focusing and talking about shooting.”

The record-breaker came on a transition basket from the right side on a pass from Rajon Rondo. The sold-out crowd at the TD Garden cheered and his teammates rose out of their seats.

“Ray is just a machine,” Celtics coach Doc Rivers said.

After the quarter ended, Allen exchanged a few words and another hug with Miller, then went down the sideline to receive his family’s congratulations.

“It’s so serendipitous that it happened the way it happened. For us to be sitting here, Reggie’s in the building and he’s in the building able to work the game,” Allen said before the game.

Miller has been cheering Allen.

“All records are made to be broken,” Miller said. “I had a conversation with Ray earlier tonight and he was like, ‘When I was a rookie and I came to Market Square Arena and I saw you for three to 31/2 hours before (the game) shooting, that’s how I wanted to pattern my game.’ “

Continue reading here: Ray Allen passes Reggie Miller for career 3-pointers

Rumsfeld: MIA on the True Costs of the Iraq War – Politics Daily

I was reading Donald Rumsfeld’s just-released memoir, “Known and Unknown,” when I came across a passage that brought me to a dead stop:

“The U.S. military involvement in Iraq has come at a high price. Combat took the lives of thousands of American servicemen and -women and left many more wounded. The U.S. Treasury spent hundreds of billions of dollars. The prolong war also poisoned our politics at home.”

What’s missing from this picture? A hundred thousand or so dead Iraqi civilians.

Iraq Body Count website, which keeps track of reported civilian casualties, reports that since the U.S. invasion there have been between 99,702 and 108, 854 documented civilian deaths in Iraq related to the war. Some estimates are higher. The actual number doesn’t matter. Rumsfeld pays no attention to the notion that many Iraqi civilians lost their lives because of the war he supported and managed.

In his recent book, George W. Bush, also ignored this cost of the war. He wrote:

For all the difficulties that followed, America is safer without a homicidal dictator pursuing WMD and supporting terror at the heart of the Middle East. The region is more hopeful with a young democracy setting an example for others to follow. and the Iraqi people are better off with a government that answers to them instead of torturing and murdering them.

When Bush was promoting his book, he told NBC’s Matt Lauer, “I will say, definitely, the world is better off without Saddam Hussein in power, as are 25 million people who now have a chance to live in freedom.”

Not everyone, though, is better off. As journalists Nir Rosen put it last November,

Certainly the hundreds of thousands of dead Iraqis are not better off. Their families aren’t better off. The tens of thousands of Iraqi men who languished in American and subsequently Iraqi gulags are not better off. The children who lost their fathers aren’t better off. The millions of Iraqis who lost their homes, hundreds of thousands of refugees in the region, are not better off. So there’s no mathematical calculation you can make to determine who’s better off and who’s not.

Bush and Rumsfeld might calculate that the benefits of the war do surpass even these particular costs. But what’s jarring is that the pair does not acknowledge this side of the ledger. I wonder why.

There are several possibilities. Perhaps they believe their calculus would be harder to defend if such extensive and tragic losses were recognized. This is a tremendous amount of blood to place on the scales. Or can it be that they have just not paid much attention to the matter of civilian casualties and are (perhaps willfully) ignoring the topic? The Pentagon apparently never officially kept a tally of the Iraqi civilian death count. Yet any honest accounting of the Iraq war — or any war — would cover this portion of the outcome. Any honest debate about the merits of a war would consider this angle.

Conservatives often hail cost-benefit analysis when it comes to government actions, such as regulations. They praise market forces. They promote the value of responsibility. At least, in the abstract. Rumsfeld’s book — and Bush’s too — is a fine example of an abandonment of such principles. The Iraq war cannot be judged without weighing these consequent deaths. But Rumsfeld and Bush duck the issue. Iraqis and citizens in other nations can be forgiven for regarding the Bushites’ inability — or unwillingness — to recognize such a tremendous loss of life as an indication that they do not much value Iraqi lives.

It’s easy for Rumsfeld, Bush, and others to proclaim that Iraqis have benefited from the war, now that the murderous Saddam and his repressive regime are gone. But Bush and Rumsfeld did not have to pay the ultimate sacrifice. They imposed it on others — without asking their consent. They were the deciders. In Iran and Egypt, the world has seen that citizens can rise up against autocrats — when they believe the time is right and when they are willing to accept the consequences of their defiance. The 100,000 or so dead Iraqi civilians were given no such choice.

Is it surprising that Rumsfeld and Bush do not pay even lip service to the dead Iraqi civilians? Probably not, for addressing this subject could cause a debate they’d obviously rather avoid. Better for these warriors to commit an act of moral cowardice than engage in that difficult fight.

You can follow David Corn’s postings and media appearances via Twitter.

Continue reading here: Rumsfeld: MIA on the True Costs of the Iraq War – Politics Daily

Ray Allen sets NBA record, 2,562 times 3


Ray Allen has spent thousands of hours alone in a gym, practicing his shot, and when all of the hard work came to fruition what he wanted most of all was to share the honor.

With his family.

With his teammates.

With Reggie Miller, who was working courtside on the TV broadcast when Allen broke his NBA record for 3-pointers today.

“Somebody told me, ‘This is your moment. Enjoy it.’ And I’m sitting there thinking I’ve never really had a moment that’s mine,” Allen said after hitting three 3-pointers against the Los Angeles Lakers to move to the top of the NBA’s all-time list. “I’ve always shared it with guys. … I’ve never had a time where I’ve had to stand out there and say ‘Thank you,’ because it really was about me.”

Allen hit his second 3 of the game with 1:48 left in the first quarter to reach 2,561 in his career – a number that flashed on the scoreboard in green and white while the TD Garden erupted in applause.

The 35-year-old Celtic celebrated little as he got back on defense, but at the next whistle went over to Miller for a hug and a handshake, then bumped fists with Lakers star Kobe Bryant.

“I’m just so happy for him because this is one of the best guys,” Miller said on the TNT broadcast. “He’s so humble, he’s so giving, he’s a great family man and I’m excited. This is great. This is great for the game of basketball. You know why? We’re focusing and talking about shooting.”

The record-breaker came on a transition basket from the right side on a pass from Rajon Rondo. The sold-out crowd at the TD Garden – the visit by the rival Lakers would have been enough for that – cheered, and his teammates rose out of their seats.

“If I could have hidden, I would have,” Allen said. “I almost felt a little embarrassed because there was so much attention surrounding this 3-point record. And I’ve never really experienced that because this is a team sport; very rarely do you get that emotional individual support. So it was so overwhelming, but it was a great moment. I’ll remember this for the rest of my life.”

After the quarter ended, Allen exchanged a few words and another hug with Miller, then went down the sideline to receive his family’s congratulations. Allen made one more in the game to finish two ahead Miller, but the Boston Celtics lost the NBA finals rematch 92-86.

“I told him, ‘I’m glad you’re here, because it is your moment as well,'” Allen said. “When we came in the league, Allen Iverson, myself, all the guys in my class that came in … Reggie was the shooting guard who we were out there competing against and trying to beat. It was a privilege to play alongside and play against him. To do this, and beat his record, and have him in the building – I wouldn’t have it any other way.”

A 6-foot-5 guard from Connecticut, Allen is the No. 25 scorer in league history, finishing the night with 21,875 points in a 15-year career with Milwaukee, Seattle and Boston. He is already the NBA’s all-time leader in 3-pointers made per game since the shot was introduced in 1979, with an average of 2.4.

“He’s just a machine,” Celtics coach Doc Rivers said before the game. “He shoots every day. He works on it. He runs every day. You look at his body. If you’re a young player just look at Ray Allen if you want a long career. He’s the ultimate pro.”

Allen got to the record a little faster than Miller, needing 6,430 shots to reach the record – a rate of 39.8. Miller took 6,486 shots from 3-point range in his 18-year career with the Indiana Pacers, making 39.5 percent.

Allen said beforehand he had unexpected trouble sleeping on Wednesday night, with the combined anticipation of an NBA finals rematch against the archrival Lakers and the chance to break the record.

“For the fans, I’m sure it’s sweet. But for me, I’m truly happy for Ray,” Bryant said. “That’s just unbelievable.”

Allen entered the season needing 117 to pass Miller, and he entered the night needing one to tie and two for the record. With the crowd cheering in anticipation every time he got the ball beyond the arc, he missed his first attempt and then made his second, from the top of the key.

Allen gave a fist pump while teammate Nate Robinson raised one finger in the air. The next time down, Paul Pierce passed Allen the ball on the left side and he fired up another shot that, to the crowd’s dismay, went off the rim. He missed the next try, too, but then got the record on his fifth 3-point attempt of the game.

“It’s some, more history, the Lakers and Celtics,” Los Angeles forward Ron Artest said with a smile. “He chose to wait and do it against us. He did it on purpose. He waited and waited ’til he played against the Lakers. He’s smart. Good marketing plan.”

– AP

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Continue reading here: Ray Allen sets NBA record, 2,562 times 3


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